Superman III

Superman III (1983)

Superman III
5.3/10 by 593 users

Aiming to defeat the Man of Steel, wealthy executive Ross Webster hires bumbling but brilliant Gus Gorman to develop synthetic kryptonite, which yields some unexpected psychological effects in the third installment of the 1980s Superman franchise. Between rekindling romance with his high school sweetheart and saving himself, Superman must contend with a powerful supercomputer.

Release Date:June 17, 1983
MPAA Rating:PG
Genres:Comedy, Action, Adventure, Fantasy, Science Fiction
Production Company:Dovemead Films, Cantharus Productions, Warner Bros. Pictures
Production Countries:United Kingdom, United States of America
Director:Richard Lester
Writers:, , ,
Casts:, , , , , , , , ,
Plot Keywords:saving the world, dc comics, super computer, identity crisis, loss of powers, sequel, superhero, based on comic, hacking, super power, superhuman strength
  • More comic-book than the first two.
    February 14, 2007

    My Take: It never reaches the heights of its predecessors with its sillier story and ridiculous villains.

    Many consider this a weak entry in the Superman film series. Well, I thought it was at first. But when I watched it in numerous reruns, I began to like this. Christopher Reeve excellently reprises his role, alongside comedy favorite Richard Pryor, as a computer-whiz, who is hired by his boss to help fulfill his plans for world domination. Pryor may not do it right sometimes, but he's admittedly hilarious in spots. But painfully ridiculous in some.

    Among the things that make it a bit unsatisfying for critics is the lack of the characters from the originals. Lois lane had to go on vacation, so Lana Lang (played well by Annette O'Toole)is Superman's/Clark Kent's love interest. Robert Vaughn plays a sinister mastermind, an okay replacement for the famous villain Lex Luther. What some viewers don't understand is that director Richard Lester wants it to be more of a comic book adventure rather than what scriptwriter Mario Puzo did in the first two.

    Rating: **1/2 out of 5.